Bucketlist – Things I’d love to do on a day off.

Today, I took an off. Was tired of routine. Was unwell too. So just thought of pausing for a moment. It wasn’t an ideal day though – nevertheless, I felt much better for it. I thought of listing things I’d do on an ideal day off 🙂

  1. I’d wake up to cool morning breeze and lightening sky. Would love to take in the calmness of early morning. Peace and quiet. Just be. Take in lovely pink and orange hues of the skies.
  2. Make myself a cup of steaming ginger-flavored tea, listening to the early morning classical raagas. Just absorbing every taan, aalap, every nuance of a bandish… experiencing its mood, sentiment, just dissolving my existence, going to faraway places within that song – that raag. Its been ages that I have done this…. I guess these days, early mornings are all about getting breakfast ready / lunch boxes ready.
  3. Would then go for a walk on the podium. It is lovely around 7 here. Much brighter than I would like, but on an off day, I am hardly going to wake up too early 🙂 . What I love about Jakarta most is its green surroundings. At least compared to Mumbai, where I lived most of my life, this city is several times greener. Evergreen trees laden in their full glory all the time. 🙂 No fall here … The facility management of this apartment complex has done lovely landscaping work and maintained well all these years. Its a pleasure to walk on the podium – especially when it is less crowded. Mild morning weather, chirpy birds, green grass, evergreen trees, flowers… would just take in everything. The hibiscus near swimming pool with bright pink blossoms, frangipanis  just about everywhere, dotted with yellow flowers, at times which are scattered on the lawns below, making a beautiful picture. I would stop to notice the toddlers over at the kiddie-swimming pool. Their laughter and bright faces will be sure to set my mood. Maybe, I will just sit on one of the benches for a while, all by myself  – just observing. Just being. Doing nothing.
  4. I would return home to be served delicious breakfast. On a day off, I wouldn’t have had to bother about deciding the menu or even cooking it. I’d just get it ready in my hands. I would eat it while scanning through the morning papers. I’d find just the right news to debate with my husband and chat leisurely. Or just to talk about nothing and everything. No rush to get to the work – no rush to be on time anywhere. No meetings, no deadlines, no notes to be written, no follow – ups.
  5. I’d then tidy up and just lounge about with a favourite book to read. I think I haven’t read a book end to end for quite a while now. It would be fun to just read for 3-4 hours at a stretch.
  6. It would then be lunch time and miraculously home made lunch would be ready waiting for me 🙂 On weekdays, I cook only a part of my morning meals, and on a day off, I’d shirk from even that. It would be awesome to eat my favourite meal – varan-bhat-batata bhaji – poli – tup and limboo. Simple Maharashtrian fare. It would taste like my mum’s cooking.
  7. After lunch I’d probably watch some movie or tele-series, out of the collection of CDs that has been accumulating here over the last 2.5 years, but really never accessed yet….
  8. Or I’d go to a spa and pamper myself – especially my feet, I feel too worn out these days.
  9. Tea-time I’d just make some nice snacks. Try something new – and quick 😉
  10. I’d then make an hour – long call to some friend . Catch up. Laugh, cry and be happy. Maybe even gossip a bit.
  11. Husband would be back early from work. Or he too has stayed in and just lounged about with me. Maybe, we will go out for a nice dinner or just stay in. We will cook dinner together. I will cook and he will be with me in the kitchen, chatting about his day, maybe he will lend a hand. Would play some nice music – maybe consorto music? maybe Vivaldi’s four seasons while we cook. We’d have risotto, some bread and some salad. 🙂 Numero uno of comfort food.
  12. We’d then walk up to the terrace and just watch the city go to sleep. Try to catch some stars in the clouded skies of Jakarta. Or we’d take our sleeping bags and just lie down, listen to radio, playing old classics.

🙂 thinking up all these things in itself made me giddy with joy. Now I can’t wait for a real day off to arrive.

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The culture of respect ?

“Ibu, aku terlambat , pesawat belum datang.” I heard a part of what my colleague was saying on phone. We were in Lombok, on an assignment and stuck at the airport. The plane taking us back to Jakarta had gotten delayed by 4 hours.  I had already called up my husband to inform and was waiting for my colleague to finish his call, before we went back to work related discussion again. “Ibu, nanti aku telepon ketika pesawat mendarat”. …

I was sort of surprised + impressed that he still calls his Ibu (Mum) first, even in his mid thirties. Indonesians are very close to their family – mostly like Indians, I had heard, but this was little out of ordinary for me.  I wouldn’t call my parents immediately under such circumstances, they need not know that I’m getting delayed and then worry about me. Maybe, he lives in a joint family. ‘The analyst’ started making her assumptions. Anyhow, after he hung up, I asked him how came he called his mother because she might worry unnecessarily. Indonesians do tend to ask even more personal questions and even to casual acquaintances or even strangers. Though I knew he wouldn’t have minded – he’s a friend.  Anyway, he did a double take – “Mother??, no, I called my wife”.  Then it was my turn to do a double take – “you  address your wife with ‘Ibu’?”. Till then, to me, Ibu meant only following things:

  1. Ibu is your own mother
  2. In formal situations, it is a title of respect – similar to ‘Madam’ – for someone senior in age / designation – mostly aged 30s and above.

So I was even more impressed with this colleague, who was addressing his wife ‘Madam’. Not jokingly, I could tell from his expressions. He added, “Of course, that’s what I always call her”.Having returned home, I mentioned this to a local friend and he set me correct. “We always call our spouses with the relevant title”. This was a shock and relief to me. After hearing the Bahasa Indonesia word for the word ‘husband’ – Suami, which has been derived from Sanskrit ‘Swami’ (master), I had been flabbergasted. So this new information was a happy shock.

 This means, husbands will call their wives – ‘Ibu’ (Madam) or Mbak (Miss) while addressing and wives will call their husbands  – Bapak/Pak (Sir), Mas (young sir I guess?) while addressing them. This to me initially seemed too formal, until I recollected that in many parts of India there still is culture of addressing significant other ‘aap’ (respect) irrespective of gender. Even kids . India always has culture of addressing husband as ‘aap’ – being the patriarchal society that it is. But in some areas even the wives are addressed in kind. In Maharashtrian culture too probably till last century I guess, the culture of calling significant other “tumhi” (respect) existed. However, I don’t think adding a title for those considered ‘junior’ was ever a part of our culture. Fortunately, today we have again gravitated to an era where genders are on equal footing when it comes to addressing each other (genders to come on equal footing in India in real sense will take probably couple of centuries more… but that is besides the point).

So, coming to the point, so far in my interactions, I haven’t come across anybody in this country, irrespective of his/her age, situation,  social status, profession etc, being addressed without title. Titles – Pak/Bapak, Mas, Mbak, Ibu, Nona (for young miss) etc are used in formal as well as casual situations. I guess, in situations with extreme familiarity, sometimes, you could be addressed only with your first name, parents calling their children etc.  I call some of my friends on first name basis, but I think their acceptance of it could be more to do with the fact that they understand differences in cultures.

To me it is amusing how the use of titles does not really impact the level of intimacy in this culture. Perhaps this is one of the reasons why Indonesians are very genial? – that they always have given respect to anyone irrespective of their status / situation by addressing them with titles?  I can only make guesses.

Shoes that don’t fit (in my drawing room)

Why do some people wear their shoes indoors?

Or let me rephrase it – why do some people continue to wear the shoes that they wore outside, indoors as well? -in  their friend’s, or even their own house?

Till recently, I never really had to think about this question and likewise, I never really thought that I would one day explore in detail about its causes etc. I have been brought up in ‘No shoes at home’ manner –  and believed that this was Indian custom. A possibility that there existed any other way to behave  – than leaving shoes at the door when entering own/another’s house, didn’t even enter my mind for a long long time. However, times have changed and brought me into contact with people who wear shoes into the house.

Our Indonesian acquaintances have never done this. So no question of this being attributable to the diverse culture. They have always removed their shoes. The people who wore shoes indoors were in fact Indians. Belonging to a particular part of India. I do not want to pinpoint it – So let me leave it at that.

There have been instances, of people from this particular part of India walking in, either alone /in a group and walking in with their shoes, noticing that the hosts (us) are barefoot and yet continuing to move about the house wearing their shoes / chappals/ sandals. When they came in as a part of a group, they still kept their shoes on while the others removed their footwear. As hosts, so far we have said nothing, but I was shocked to see this repeatedly ever since I moved here. And only by people from one specific part of India.

To me, shoes worn outside are dirty and unhygienic. They must be carrying not only dirt and dust but who knows , even bacteria/fungi and what not from various public places that they’ve been worn to. Removing them means avoiding infesting the host’s house with that dirt. I guess, this is how I was brought up. Both India and Indonesia are countries where hygiene at public places can be an issue and people staying in either of these countries should be mindful of this. Further, noticing that the hosts (As well as other guests when they remove shoes,) are barefoot, and still continuing to wear shoes despite of that, is sort of arrogant and disrespectful.

I try and request those who are friends, and they do listen. However, this doesn’t guarantee that they’d remember next time. The job of reminding is quite embarrassing then. That apart, usually as a host it is a dilemma whether requesting the guests to remove shoes will give offence, some of them being my husband’s business associates. I guess, I never really imagined that Indians would do this. Most of the non – Indians ASK you – if they need to remove the shoes. They are very mindful about differences in the culture. Desi guests however neither ask nor are they expected to be unaware. Following rules at the host’s place is not culture specific I think. It is universal.

Anyway, after one more such experience yesterday, when some of my husband’s Indian associates came over for dinner and a couple of them promptly ignored that both the hosts and some of their colleagues had removed footwear, I was forced to think about the possible reasons for this practice of wearing shoes indoors. I came up with –

  1. Weather – People from this community in India belong to a region which can get too hot or too cold. Maybe the floor heats up or gets stark cold and you need to protect the feet. In this case well – this is Jakarta. Perennially stuck at 32 degrees celsius and definitely neither too hot nor too cold.
  2. Some people have ‘house slippers’ or house footwear.  – Basically they constantly wear something in their feet till they go to sleep. Yes, many people in my family too do this. However, the house footwear is not same as outdoor footwear and if they go to someone’s place for couple of hours, they probably can survive without footwear. Some families I know keep spare house footwear for guests. I haven’t done it so far and I don’t think it is practical especially when you are hosting a number of people at the same time.
  3. Some people have health issues or some injury – in which case it is understandable. However I guess this would be exception and even the hygiene-OCD affected people will accommodate such guests.

I could not think about a ‘culture’ specific reason  – none of the above is specific to that culture. Many people live in areas in India which have extreme climates. Not just this particular part of India. Anyway, I found a thread on metafilter discussing exactly this – but in the western countries. This was new to me. I had imagined that US and UK have colder climes and hence probably they must be wearing shoes inside the house. But I had no idea that in many parts, its the same pair of shoes that is worn outside the house. I find it amusing (because its not in my own house of course 😉  ) that some even wear shoes on their beds. But this thread gave many reasons why a person might be wearing same pair of shoes inside the house, what they wore outside.

Anyhoo, my rant is done. Time to sign off. In case anyone knows any cultural reasons why some INDIANS might be wearing their outdoor shoes indoors, please let me know.

My Mum (Always) Never….

Image

My Mum (Always) Never....

Story of my life

It takes a lot of planning to get a manicure ….

I am writing here after several months , being provoked by finely manicured feet with nice nail paint.  Goes without saying that the feet in question don’t belong to me. Now that would have been unusual enough as well actually, to qualify for a blog post. Sadly, that unusual event is yet to occur.  Though, I hope that someday, living in such a grooming – obsessed country as Indonesia, I will begin to really try at least, the things such as hairdo/hairstyles other than bun, various styled earrings other than the studs and formal wear other than trousers and shirts.  Well, I don’t really want to write about my lack of fashion – sense in this post, though of course, that has been giving me inferiority complex in this country where all the women I come across seem to be the walking examples of runway models,  women that have been gifted with naturally lithe yet slim bodies and smaller frames (Especially, my female colleagues who are 20 years older to me, are much better groomed and stylish than I ever could be in my life and take a 15 minute loo-break daily in the afternoon to touch-up their make – up and curl their eyebrows. By the way, I saw eye-brow curler for the first time in my life here…again, I am digressing …   )

So, coming to my point – yesterday, I met a bunch of Indian women my age (though have kids in class 1/2  now! , makes me feel super old, I know,  though they got married super early and shifted here…again, I am digressing)  – we had all gathered to discuss what to showcase at the upcoming expat ‘Diwali Mela’. Last year, we had performed a group dance, complete with traditional costumes, stage property and so on.

At one point, they started discussing their schedules.  Some of them are housewives with kids and others are working women with kids. All of their lives outside of office / house work revolve around kids – their homework, school projects, their performances, activities, various hobby classes. The kind of burden that 6-7 year old kids have on themselves is unimaginable actually. My generation I guess was one of the last few generations that could play at the ‘age of playing’. Sounds funny to say –  but that’s true. These expat 6-7 year old kids seem to be just moving – out of school into some activity class, out of that class into a hobby class and so on. From what I’ve been reading about India, I guess similar things are happening back home too…

Anyhow, I noticed the shining red nail-paint on the feet of one of these 4.30 am waking – numerous lunches- packing, numerous home-made -things- making working Mum. And I took a deep breath. Slowly, I took in the feet of all the other women at the venue. Only colour changed. Light pink, maroon, magenta, brown… whatever the colour, but the feet were well manicured (or pedicured – not sure what to call it), looked smooth, soft with a shining coat of nail paint. And I sighed. For myself. I didn’t have to look down at my feet – I knew exactly how ugly, rough, hideous mine would look. Then I spent few moments wondering how on the earth they could manage all their work AND getting their manicure??? That 4.30 am club looked to me as if they were totally in control of their time… what have I been doing with MY time??

When was the last time I really applied anything to my feet? Cream even? Almost 2 years back. At my wedding.  When was the last time I did anything to my face?  – that was in January 2013, when I was in India. When was the last time I styled my hair – in India again. In January 2012!! It’s not like I HAVE to do or HAVE to confirm to this standard of expat Indian woman in Indonesia. It’s just that I WANT to improve my grooming and nobody’s really been stopping me. Just that I NEVER FOUND THE TIME to do it!  TILL NOW. More so, after I began working here. It is so weird. Actually it is not. I am tardy.  Never taking the trouble really and just wanting to change things about myself….

Planning meals, organizing house, keeping things in order etc have never been my forte, but I had never imagined before marrying, how much of the married life means only this – especially if you don’t live with in-laws and have to entertain guests from time to time. Though, even if you don’t have anyone over at your place, living with a second person, the significant other, means that several things have to be acceptable to the both – including food. I never had imagined that thinking about laundry, meals, cleaning etc will be an important part of my daily thought process and so having not been much interested in all the domestic management before marriage, I find my hands full just with the two of us, short of containers to stock groceries with, all the times, overstuffed fridge and short of place to put clothes.  I am guessing (Correctly) that life will get even more dramatic whenever we plan to start a family!!  I can imagine how our life would have been in Mumbai currently, had we not quit our jobs there and continued to work wherever we were working. We probably wouldn’t have had any time together – what’s with the super long working  hours, commuting and family obligations. Since both of us belong to extremely traditional and large families, the obligations would have taken precedence over everything. Here, while we are away from these aspects, we still are in short of time  –  we always have unfinished chores at hand. I guess, we need to learn a lot. It takes a lot of planning I suppose to have your feet manicured….

Creativity project roundup – What I did between February 12 and February 15

Well, I have been super busy this week and was earlier unable to post details and relevant pictures. I am attempting to combine everything in a single post…

February 12 – I devised a new fitness plan for myself. I NEED to focus on gaining my muscle mass and build endurance. Given the changes in my schedule that I expect from coming week onwards, I thought I had to think up something like a fitness schedule. Weight loss if it happens will be incidental. I also need to add more proteins and fiber to my food.  I’ve set a goal of running/walking 500 kms over next 45 weeks (By end of 2013). A mix of running and walking simply because I want to slowly build my endurance, having known my capacity first. In fact, I HAD embarked on this plan on the same day, promptly felt sick the next day and spent couple days recuperating! So I have now made several changes, so that my strength and endurance develop gradually.

February 13 – This was Ganesh Jayanti day. The birthday of Hindu deity – Ganesha. I had an apt activity for the day. My husband believes in performing puja every day and while we do have a periwinkle plant which bears flowers regularly, many a times we don’t have flowers to offer to the deities. So I had thought of creating artificial embellishments which could be used in place of flowers. So I created little maalas of two types. For these, I went to the local mall and picked out standard items. It wasnt thrifted at all. These items are fairly standard and reasonably priced…

P1020275

P1020295

These maalas are quite tiny – so I kept a glue stick in the picture so that their size could be seen in perspective. Though these are tiny, they took quite a long time to make. Especially the one with beads. Because while I have used double thread to add in yellow beads, I have used single threads to add in red ones and added 2 red beads every time in each thread (I am not sure if I am explaining well – but anyone if at all interested can contact me for details) – plus these beads were tiny and it took forever to string them. I initially had used a needle, but then I thought of singling and doubling alternately and so it was relatively easier without needle…

February 14 – Continuing the earlier step of getting to know a few gals within the vicinity, I invited them for a function at my place. Menu was simple – pav bhaji and gajar ka halwa, but we spent good time chatting and getting to know each other more. I also arranged for small mementos – this was to be ‘haldi-kumkum’ function, a typical tradition amongst Hindu married women. So planning, inviting, shopping and then cooking and hosting took up the entire day…

February 15  – New? it was my anniversary. Wrote quite a few letters. To various important people in my family. One was hand delivered and others will be going through snail mails… Not intended to be shared here. Period.

All in all, apart from this, all these days kept me super busy with various guests dropping in at various times… busy, exhausting week.  But a fun week indeed.

Ciao

Once you make a decision, the universe conspires to make it happen…

Someone has said that….and how truthful is that statement! Having decided to pursue  this creativity project, my mind is on overdrive these days and everything that I see first subconsciously passes through a ‘can this be useful for creativity project’ scanner….

Yesterday, I was low and just to divert myself, I went for a stroll+ window-shopping trip to a mall near the house. My eyes got drawn to a shop with trinkets . These days, I have noticed, I seem to be subconsciously looking for DIY inspirations everywhere. At home, when I see even smallest throw-able things such as shiny silver chocolate wrappers, I start thinking whether they can be used in any way….I’m not sure that’s entirely good because hoarding trash cannot always be a good idea and there is a reason why people throw away trash… anyhow.

So I came across this trinkets shop and just went in there without consciously thinking anything – just to look at those colourful things. Maybe I expected to feel better. This shop was inside out (including its Neon Banner) pink, targeted mostly at teenage girls of course, and selling overpriced items. I took it in with a very critical eye (Than I ordinarily would have). Eventually, I decided to leave. Just as I was leaving, I saw this beautiful paper bag made out of a batik gift wrapping paper. Indonesia has a beautiful batik motif tradition and even gift wrapping papers come in a variety of batik designs, some of which are very beautiful. I just couldn’t resist checking its price tag. I was flabbergasted to know it was being sold at some 30,000 IDR. In Indian Rupees that would roughly translate into Rs. 150. My experience so far is, having converted into INR, everything is twice as costly here. Eg: Onions are IDR. 24000 a Kg, which is Rs.120 in INR and twice the cost of onions in India, viz Rs. 60 per Kg. Probably onions are selling at less than that currently, but I have seen this calculation work in many other instances. Therefore, if anything is costing more than twice the Indian price (when converted into INRs) is really a costly item for me. Anyhow, this logic apart, even if that bag would be sold for INR 75 in India, I would never have paid that much for it. Looking at the bag, I thought I could easily try to replicate it at home.

I came across a gift wrapping shop – yes, there are even gift wrapping shops here, something that probably doesn’t exist in India in  middle class or upper middle class areas and probably will take another 5-10 years to come up… Anyhow, I went to Carrefour  from there and bought supplies – namely a gift wrapping paper with batik design. This one is cheap at IDR 2300 viz Rs. 11.5 in INR terms. I wanted this to be a trial and hence I bought a very basic paper. The papers with better designs are obviously costly  – probably ranging between IDR. 5000 – IDR 10000 here – (in INR 25-50).

The only things that I used are – gift wrapping paper, 3 newspaper pages to add thickness to the paper, a little card paper at the bottom, and strings made out of white thick ‘nada’ thread. I even dipped the ‘nada’ into turmeric to make it yellow. The end result is the picture below. Probably angle is not right, but the bag doesn’t look broad at the top and tapering at the bottom as this picture shows. It is uniformly rectangular. My camera started showing write error so all the other shots I took cannot be read.

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Supplies: A gift wrapping paper, glue, small card-paper, two ‘nada’ threads, newspaper (I took 3 pages for the thickness)

In conclusion – A paper bag. Not bad when I consider how much of a big Z I am when it comes to all such things. If this project is improving my eye for all such things then I’d say it would be great….Also, total cost of this would be just IDR 2300+ whatever those two threads and 3 papers from newspaper would cost. So all inclusive,the price would be at most IDR 5000, which is one – sixth of the sale price that I saw… *happy* 🙂

Bis bald, Gute Nacht…

I just made a new….

Remember that every good friend was once a str...

Remember that every good friend was once a stranger☺☻ (Photo credit: Vijay Bandari)

Friend. …yes, a new friend..

Before I delve into the details, a back story is in order:

2 nights earlier….

It was 10.0 pm and we were sitting in our drawing-room watching some TV program. There was a knock at the door. Half expecting to be the watchman and unable to guess why he would knock at such a late hour, I opened the door.  There stood a young Indian woman with a child of around 3 tagging behind her. As soon as I looked at her, she said in fluent Marathi, “मी तुमच्या वर राहते. माझ्या मुलाची pant तुमच्या gallery च्या कठड्यावर अडकली आहे. मला ती देता का?” – translated into English this means – “I live in the flat above yours. My son’s pair of pants is stuck in the railing of your balcony. Can you please retrieve it?”. I said, “Oh”, and went to check for the said item – barely registering the fact that she was speaking in Marathi, my mother tongue. It was there, the garment, nestled between the grill and the AC’s compressor. I handed it over to her. Before anything else could be said, she said thank you and turned back. I stood at the door, certain odd things about this encounter started registering:

  1. How in the world this lady knew we spoke Marathi?  – India has 26 national languages and we could have belonged to any of the other language groups.
  2. From her looks, she did not seem Maharashtrian (a Marathi speaking person). She looked more like a north Indian to me and in that case her request in Marathi would be extraordinary.
  3. She did not introduce herself at all apart from telling us that she lived on the next floor, in a flat above ours. She did not ask us our name either.
  4. So did we – we did not ask her name or tell ours. We did not invite her in.

We were perplexed for few moments but soon decided to kill the suspense. Being short of time (probably last time this fortnight), I chose to do it today. Those who know me would also know that I am not exactly an outgoing person and I don’t go out and make friends, my friendships happen gradually. So going out and knocking on a stanger’s door and introducing myself would be totally anti-me. But I decided to do exactly that today. Yes, I hesitated a bit earlier. But then I convinced myself that the maximum that can happen is the lady shutting the door on my face and that was okay because she did not know me personally or I, her and it should not matter. I wasnt exactly sure if she was staying in the flat above me or above my neighbor, because in either cases the garment could get stuck in my balcony…

With some curiosity I knocked the door. At first there was no answer. I knocked again second time, louder this time. There she was. I introduced myself. I said, I was sorry I forgot to introduce myself the other day and that is why I came. She called me in and the rest was history 🙂 We chatted. For almost two hours. Turns out, she knew we existed because of a common friend. That is how she also knew our mother tongue. She is not a Maharashtrian, as I correctly guessed, she is a Gujarati, born and brought up in Pune, a city in Maharashtra. She thanked me for having taken this chance to come, because she herself would have felt quite awkward doing such a thing and we never would have gotten to know each other. As I left, I invited her over for a smallish function that I am holding for my new friends soon.

It was fun getting out of comfort zone. It was bit awkward for sure, but definitely enjoyable, especially, because S, my new friend too responded in the manner that I wanted. All in all, happy outcome.

Anyhow, does this qualify as a creative project activity? I think it does. I got out of my comfort zone and made an attempt to make friends with a stranger. How many times do we do that regularly?

The idea behind creative challenge was to get out of my daily rut, my comfort zone and experience something new. Do some new things, create, think – different from my usual way. There was creative writing (and some more will come along), Objects..(DIY, banner) and I felt why should human relationships be left alone? What all these activities also do is create a unique experience every time. That’s what was my objective – to make my own life interesting. So today, I set out to make a new friend….and new friend, I did make!!

Gute Nacht, bis bald.

Hujan hari ini…

English: rain

English: rain (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Sekarang Hujan besar!

Aku tidak bisa lihat gedung depan rumah saya.

Hujan sangat besar…balkon saya banjir….

Mendung banyak…ada kilat…angin suara…..ohh… ini badai…takut aku!!

Aku tunggu di rumah aku untuk suami aku…

Semua orang kembali dari Kantor, tapi terlambat mereka, karena macet..

Ohh, mau makan gorengan….selalu waktunya hujan….

Atau teh jahe wangi….

Benar, makan gorengan dengan teh jahe wangi 🙂 🙂

Lebih, makanan dan minuman sekarang. Sampai nanti….

Thats my exercise for the day. A short note in Bahasa Indonesia. It is a creative challenge enough…without being time consuming. I am already learning this language, but I need a lot of practise. Today, I decided to write ten lines in Bahasa Indonesia. Of course, most of the weather – related words I had to double check with my maid who had come in the afternoon, and with some of my friends on the group chat – but it was a great exercise, because ten relevant (to each other) sentences have emerged, which are not concerned with buying, bargaining or asking for directions… which are my only occassions of speaking Bahasa Indonesia….

I had made a couple of local friends…but unfortunately both had to move out of Jakarta… and the rest of Indonesian friends are my husband’s who always speak to me in English…any hoo… time to sign off….

Selamat sore….sampai jumpa….

I am a closet DIY enthusiast…

I am saying that sarcastically. I am not too sure about ‘DIY’ as a subject in general.

Generally, mentioning in ‘craft’ and ‘Pradnya’ in same sentence can give many people seizure. So I avoid that risk. I am really BAD at it.

I have quite a many things to do through this creative project, so I wasnt short of ideas, but I was short of time. That is the only reason WHY I have attempted this. Please forgive me.

I have made a bookmark. ………

Now go ahead and laugh. I too laughed when I thought about it. The last time I had made a bookmark was in class 2 I think. In higher classes, we had complicated projects….

This was not meant to ‘suit my own purposes’ , ‘level of difficulty’ wise. The reader who commented on such lines on my previous post also knows very well, how I literally ‘suck’ at art and crafts… in fact I wanted to avoid this. I even toyed with idea of coming up with ‘Haiku’. 🙂 🙂 Trust me, Haiku  – coming up with three lines (relevant to each other and metaphorical / poetic) was never as difficult before….. 🙂 🙂 Well, given the time constraints obviously, I did not spend much time on it of course and moved on to this… bookmark … (I can see those readers who know me personally chuckling here 🙂 )

Of course, I made rules for this – I gave myself only 5 minutes to look up any thing that I would have normally thrown away – but now can use for ‘artistic’ purposes. I timed it.

A cardpaper from mobile phone box, 3-4 laces and a transparent pouch that earlier contained a shampoo sample.

A cardpaper from mobile phone box, 3-4 laces and a transparent pouch that earlier contained a shampoo sample.

I spent next 15 minutes making this. The pattern I thought up immediately. There were no multiple patterns in my mind. So this hardly took any time.

Without further ado, I present to you –

:)  it sure serves the purpose...

🙂 it sure serves the purpose…

My first ever craft project since probably class 6 or something (after which ‘crafts’ became an optional subject and obviously I gave it up… )

Please be kind to me….

In conclusion – DIY opened up a whole new avenue for me. While it might not be pretty / sleek and all, it definitely IS a bookmark, and usable at that. I was happy overall about the way I was able to come up with a pattern almost immediately. I have even used a sort of technique etc there, with which I modified one of the components… Makes me want to try something like this again. Indulge me if I do…Who knows, over the time, my ideas and skill of hands will improve… 🙂

Auf wiedersehen.